MOVIE REVIEWS

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?

by Attila Gyula Balázs

“His wisdom is unabashed and brilliant, simple and quiet. This must see documentary embraces what Fred loved and, without the shame of recourse, accurately portrays his bold yet humble approach.”

I give this film

Fred Rogers Appears before a senate sub committee to defend PBS. He speaks to John Pastore, a democrat from Rhode Island who is completely against the funding.

Television. America’s, and perhaps the world’s, most influential educational figure, has a short and often sordid history. In the midst of humorous humiliation, sex sells, and wholesale violence, there was a one man who had a different vision and a will to form it.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor follows Fred Roger’s life in a well paced an beautiful way. Featuring never before seen interviews and family films, we are transported to a world where TV was first born and Roger’s was a young man seeking a career in faith. While you can watch this epic four and half hour interview with Rogers here this film does what any great documentary does and shows his life though those that lived with him. Featuring new Interviews with his wife, Joanne Rogers, Yo-Yo Ma, Joe Negri, David NewellFrançois Scarborough ClemmonsKailyn DavisMcColm Cephas Jr.,

As a filmmaker, I look at much of what is being produced today as formulaic and commercial garbage, and while I believed it was something that began happening during my generation, the truth is, Roger’s notices this effect throughout his career. What I’ve coined as the Spongebob effect is the concept that the faster TV goes the faster our brain requires stimulation causing a loss of interest in life’s slower pleasures. In my opinion, this type of nurturing is the root of most ADD and ADHD in this country. In his own time, Roger’s was told he made bad television, it’s unfortunate that what is seen as good television is really only good for sales and potentially harmful for its audience.

His wisdom is unabashed and brilliant, simple and quiet. This must see documentary embraces what Fred loved and without the shame of recourse, accurately portrays his bold yet humble approach. This film processes for adults what he taught to children for decades, “There’s not person in the world like you, and I like you just the way you are.” More inspiration.

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